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Stop Press is ISBN Magazine’s guide to happenings in Hong Kong. From art to auctions and from food to fashion, to entertainment, cinema, sport, wine and design, scroll through the best of the city's dynamic cultural offerings. And if your event merits mention in our little book of lifestyle chic, write to us at stoppress@isbn-magazine.com

Top of the Pops

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Now extended until April 1, 2013 - 210,000 visitors have seen the exhibit since its December 16 opening - the Hong Kong Museum of Art's Andy Warhol: 15 Minutes Eternal exhibition comprises more than 400 works by the influential superstartist divided into four sections spanning the 1950's to the '80s. Paintings, drawings - Warhol cited fashion illustrator René Gruau as a big influence during the first decade of his career in the 1950's - photographs and screen prints, sculptures, films and videos [he made more than 600 films and nearly 2,500 videos], ensure Warhol's prodigious output is broadly represented. His greatest hits are there - the Campbell's Soup Can series, the Brillo Box, the Marilyn, Mao and self-portraits, along with art project Time Capsule-23, which includes items collected by Warhol during his visit to Hong Kong in 1982.

The surprise is that the lesser known work is more interesting and more varied. As chief curator Eve Tam notes: "I am sure visitors will appreciate the fact that the art of Andy Warhol is more than the familiar images of Campbells Soup Cans and Marilyn Monroe."  His shoe illustrations from the 1950s are high on style and humour, the latter a quality less evident the longer Warhol's work goes on; Suicide [1964],  a grainy black and white silkscreen print depicts a man  with bent legs and upraised arms in free-fall following a leap from a high-rise tower, and is harrowingly reminiscent of the World Trade Centre attacks of September 11, 2001. Alternatively, installation piece Silver Clouds [1960s] is a room filled with free-floating pillow-shaped silver balloons - a fantastical children's playground - conceived by Warhol to give visitors a joyful experience. It's fun, smart, surprising, the sort of mass-participation counter-culture that says Warhol's Pop art is for everyone. 

Sunsets [1972] - who knew Warhol painted such natural subjects - emerge like a prototype Apple Mac colour palette. A 'Children's Gallery' showcases Warhol's work for pop tots in 1983; monkeys, parrots, dogs and circus clowns are set against Fish wallpaper. The extended Long Horse painting is enchanting, and the Day-Glo pink and chartreuse of Warhol's Cow (left) in wallpaper format vivid and uplifting. Films Empire and Eat are worth a diversion, while Greek king Alexander the Great [1982] gets two iconic images to himself. All of which goes to prove, when it comes to Warhol's pop art, there's more fizz in the less familiar. 

The Hong Kong Museum of Art, 10 Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon. From 10am to 8pm daily. The museum is closed on Thursdays (except public holidays) and the first two days of Chinese New Year. Admission HK$20 on Monday, Tuesday and Friday to Sunday, and HK$10 on Wednesday. 

 

Image: Andy Warhol, Cow, 1966, screen print on wallpaper. Collection of The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh ©2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

Admin

Top of the Pops

http://www.isbn-magazine.com/stop_press/files/armadillo/media/35.jpg

Now extended until April 1, 2013 - 210,000 visitors have seen the exhibit since its December 16 opening - the Hong Kong Museum of Art's Andy Warhol: 15 Minutes Eternal exhibition comprises more than 400 works by the influential superstartist divided into four sections spanning the 1950's to the '80s. Paintings, drawings - Warhol cited fashion illustrator René Gruau as a big influence during the first decade of his career in the 1950's - photographs and screen prints, sculptures, films and videos [he made more than 600 films and nearly 2,500 videos], ensure Warhol's prodigious output is broadly represented. His greatest hits are there - the Campbell's Soup Can series, the Brillo Box, the Marilyn, Mao and self-portraits, along with art project Time Capsule-23, which includes items collected by Warhol during his visit to Hong Kong in 1982.

The surprise is that the lesser known work is more interesting and more varied. As chief curator Eve Tam notes: "I am sure visitors will appreciate the fact that the art of Andy Warhol is more than the familiar images of Campbells Soup Cans and Marilyn Monroe."  His shoe illustrations from the 1950s are high on style and humour, the latter a quality less evident the longer Warhol's work goes on; Suicide [1964],  a grainy black and white silkscreen print depicts a man  with bent legs and upraised arms in free-fall following a leap from a high-rise tower, and is harrowingly reminiscent of the World Trade Centre attacks of September 11, 2001. Alternatively, installation piece Silver Clouds [1960s] is a room filled with free-floating pillow-shaped silver balloons - a fantastical children's playground - conceived by Warhol to give visitors a joyful experience. It's fun, smart, surprising, the sort of mass-participation counter-culture that says Warhol's Pop art is for everyone. 

Sunsets [1972] - who knew Warhol painted such natural subjects - emerge like a prototype Apple Mac colour palette. A 'Children's Gallery' showcases Warhol's work for pop tots in 1983; monkeys, parrots, dogs and circus clowns are set against Fish wallpaper. The extended Long Horse painting is enchanting, and the Day-Glo pink and chartreuse of Warhol's Cow (left) in wallpaper format vivid and uplifting. Films Empire and Eat are worth a diversion, while Greek king Alexander the Great [1982] gets two iconic images to himself. All of which goes to prove, when it comes to Warhol's pop art, there's more fizz in the less familiar. 

The Hong Kong Museum of Art, 10 Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon. From 10am to 8pm daily. The museum is closed on Thursdays (except public holidays) and the first two days of Chinese New Year. Admission HK$20 on Monday, Tuesday and Friday to Sunday, and HK$10 on Wednesday. 

 

Image: Andy Warhol, Cow, 1966, screen print on wallpaper. Collection of The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh ©2012 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York

Admin